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developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> people typically don't admit sexual assaults and murders to police officers unless, many of the, they probably have done it. so it was clear, we felt, he was responsible for the tricia reitler disappearance. >> she had such a zest for life. and she would walk in the room and everybody knew she was there. >> tricia reitler, a 19-year-old psych major at indiana wesleyan university was on her way to becoming a family counselor. >> her goal was to be able to put families back together again. >> then, in march 1993, donna and gary reitler received that late-night phone call every rent dreads, a cop from marion, indiana, was on the line. >> he said, do you know where tricia is? in my heart, i knew that something was drastically wrong. >> tricia had walked to an off-campus supermarket, and never returned to her dorm. now, n
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> license plate extra hp. >> extra hp. >> by the early '90s, jimmy keene was on top of the world. his booming business afforded him a lavish lifestyle with large homes, souped-up corvettes and an endless supply of women. >> i would have 30 or 40 keg parties with volleyball nets, live bands. we'd have literally a thousand people or more sometimes. i mean, these were gigantic, huge parties. >> you were the guy women wanted to be with and guys wanted to be best friends with. >> something like that. >> back then he owned this 6,000-square-foot home. >> right behind that is a golf course. >> he says he didn't stash the drugs here. >> this is a walk-in closet. >> but there was always a place to hide his fortunes. >> this was a hidden trap door that you could open, and when you would open it you have another hidden closet back in here. you can see my old safe is still here. and this
environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state. you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the hospitable reach of ou
stock and interact with clients, and secondly, a hospitable government environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the fcc making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship, and people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy, and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbedded the floors sewed clothes, and cut my hair, but now we are blessed by the american dream, and i want to keep it alive for others. the third role is the entrepreneur, the role i played. entrepreneur, hospitable governmental environment, and the workers are what create success in america. we have to keep the three legs of the stool strong and vibrant. >> thank you for the opening statement. i'll ask one or two, and then we'll go around the table. especially interested to hear you talk about obama create the legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke on society saying the obama administration wants to, quote, annihilate the r
to people that live in solano county to help prescription abuse and protect the environment. >>> well the city of new orleans says they are ready to welcome the 49ers when the team flies there tomorrow night. the city has planned for the super bowl for the past two years. they have spent close to $750 million renovating the super dome, convention center as well as the airport. new orleans will host the super bowl and mardi gras during the next two weeks. >> our great city, new orleans, is ready for mardi gras and thesuper bowl xlvii. nobody has done these two things ever. >> security is a priority. new orleans is adding 300 officers from outside law enforcement agencies to help with patrols. >>> president obama plans to hold wall street accountable for any wrong doing. >> but we also know the free market works best for everybody when we have smart common sense rules in place to prevent irresponsible behavior. >> in this morning's weekly address, the president highlighted his nomination of mary jo white to the exchange commission and richard cordre for the consumer protection bureau as
. >> the environment protection agency has let levied a $20,000 fine on princess cruises for releasing wastewater and alaska famed glacier bay. the agency says princess violated the clean water act and the golden princess, discharge pull water into the famous a pristine and bart of glacier bay national park and preserve. princess has blamed the release of a software malfunction on the ship that cost pool dump all valves to open. about two ledges 77 t of water from the golden princes pools flowed into the wild life filled bay. >> safety has, in fact, become one of the highest rate attributes for most car shoppers, whether they're looking for a minivan or sports car. so, a new study out this morning is likely to deliver more than a few surprises when comes to listing the safest and least safe among the vehicles now on the market. here are some of the top five safest according to issue .com. gmc siera 1500. porshe caymnne. gmc yukon denali . >> gmc sierra 2500 hd sle. >> gmc terrain sle 1. >> as for the five least safest vehicles fiat 500. >> kia nri 5. >> toyota corolla l . >> mr. b sitsubishi l
innovation and entrepreneurship. each of us is committed to fostering the kind of environment that supports the private sector and which turns ideas into innovations, innovations into products, products into companies that help create good jobs. under current policy, one way we do that federally is by supporting research and development through the existing r&d tax credit. companies that invest in r&d generate new products which sparks new industries with spillover benefits for all kinds of sectors. that's why there's long been strong bipartisan support for the existing r&d tax credit. by all accounts, it's working. the r&d credit has helped tens of thousands of american companies succeed and create jobs. but there's a critical gap in the existing r&d credit. it isn't available to start-ups because they're not yet profitable. and, thus, they don't have an income tax liability against which to take a credit. in fact, more than half the r&d credit last year was taken by companies with revenue over a billion, well-established, profitable companies. there's nothing wrong with that. it's just no
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
is stronger, maybe they're worried about issues related to the environment. these are not issues that republicans like to talk about. they're not issues that are good at talking about. this is where it emerged in the late 1990's from a time when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington. the whole point of bush was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. something like the prescription drug bill was too big and should have been paid for. the republican party will never give back to the wilderness. we have to keep our brand pure and make sure americans and no where the party of small government. americans are confident that the republican party is the party's small government. they did not vote for the republican party. it is possible that he should not nominate mitt romney next time and get a true conservative, if you look at opinion polls, barack obama won the election because people thought he cared about people like us. that is a touchy-feely kind of sentiment. it is the kind of sentiment that republican politicians have
an environment that was more advantageous for small business leaders to make investments that would lead to more jobs. that is the third truth. people create jobs. most people understand that. they get that the best way to create opportunity is to empower people, particularly small business to be in a position to do that. those are the things that are relevant. the same pundits who said that we need to change our principles talked about certain voting blocs and segments out there -- young voters, women voters, kids coming out of college, ethnic minorities, immigrants. i think the message as long it is in terms of where those voters are at, i think that is one mistake many republicans did. we stayed in a place as we were too comfortable. if you are an immigrant like my family who came from other countries generations ago, our weather were like my brothers in-laws who came to generations ago from mexico, in each case, we can for some of the same reasons. they wanted to come for a better life. we wanted an education. they wanted to work hard and live the american dream. that is a theme that does no
% per year. all right? so higher rate environments don't necessarily mean, or not mutually exclusive of positive and constructive equity market returns. >> charles, i want to ask barry the same question after i ask you, but i would -- give me a number on where you think it would hurt? because i could see, i could see all the way up to 4.5% being construed as a positive. which is still such a low historical number for a ten-year, for whatever, i could see where that would help savers, it would help, you know, the return on some pension plans, and it would indicate economic growth much better than we have right now. it's something that japan wishes they had for the past 20 years, because it would at least indicate some economic activity. i can't even imagine it would be a headwind all the way up to 4.5% or 5% for equities. i don't know about the mortgage market. what do you think, charles? >> it's not just the absolute level, joe. >> but years from now, two, three years. we're going to get back there eventually, right? >> eventually i think we will. and i think if the path is a control
school environment, moving forward we want to continue to dramatically improve existing schools and give parents the opportunity to choose legitimate alternatives to failing schools. [applause] in addition to transforming education, we must continue to reform government. take a waste, fraud and abuse commission, for example. so far they've identified nearly $456 million worth of savings. [applause] our reforms allow state government to focus on efficiency so taxpayers get great service without needless spending and waste. our reforms also give schools and local governments flexibility to make management choices to improve their communities while saving money. for example be, our technical schools are saving millions of dollars by making simple, common sense changes to instructor schedules and overtime policies. and they're saving money with a program that allows nonviolent jail inmates to do maintenance work like mowing grass and shoveling snow. and much of the work being done is about finding creative solutions to problems faced by the state. several years ago the previous governor clos
be a better candidate for them in this environment that they expect to be running in in 2014. you don't want to be an incumbent. you don't want to be entrenched washington. you want to have a little more leeway to run against washington. >> coming out from the outside it actually provides what you're saying. it gives them that balance. i think what the biggest problem right now in washington is that you have all these senators, these lions that basically remember how washington used to work. nonpartisan -- in a bipartisanship manner. they're getting tired. what message does that say for the next generation of leadership? >> perry, it's interesting. they're free votes now. tom harkin running for re-election, where would he have been on guns? saxby chambliss, where's he going to be? >> he might be someone who plays a big role in somebody who compromises on the debt, deficit. that's what he wants to do anyway. he can now behave as he wants to behave. >> how important, pete, is it that these guys announce early these decisions? >> it's huge. especially for primaries to try and hopefully clear th
and what is the most of corn tissue of our time, the environment we live in. obviously we have to protect it. i think that is a possibility and probably something that may be effective. stuart: wouldn't do any good? >> if we could get bipartisan support, it could -- stuart: when it would lower carbon emissions in a miniscule, may be lower the temperature is your.1% over a longer period of time. it is just a fund of money. that is why -- that is what it is all about. >> those dollars would be used for other efforts to control and focus on changing climate. stuart: they would just fill government coffers with that the needed money. >> if that is the case they wouldn't be a good thing. stuart: when you are if in favor of carbon tax to raise money. >> i am not. i am in favor of it as a way of controlling, beginning to control global warming and giving resources to combat it. stuart: i want to bring you the answer to the quiz we brought you before the break. we asked who said this? i am quoting directly. i am so tired of hearing that the rich are not paying their fair share of taxes. yes we ar
and our universities for the blind that we need here in america. not only the environment in which they can come here and study, but say here if they are needed. connell: making sure that it is not included in this deal, whatever that turns out to be? >> amnesty. there has to be a pathway to citizenship. people who follow the law should not be burdened by those that do not. connell: defined what that means . >> the 11 login or so have to be encouraged to come out of the shadows and join those already in line. there has to be an incentive for them to do that. it has to be negotiated. that is what we are afraid of. we do not believe that 11 million should be granted citizenship to prevent those that have followed the rules from the pathway to citizenship that they followed. connell: last thing on the prediction of the politics on this before we let you go. you think this will be a hard-fought, year-long battle or do you think we will get something done really quick? >> it depends on whether or not they want to treat this like obamacare. no transparency. i think it will be very hard t
in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the store was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not heard anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me and on reasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles and the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because everyone they know voted against him.
? in 1992, you had the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the story was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not hurt anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles in the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because ever
are not the people with political power. but if you have an environment in which business is hesitant to relocate headquarters in the city because of these issues, then you're going to get people's attention. that's a terrible thing to say, but that is simply the political reality. >> christie hefner, thank you so much. it's great to see you. >> always great to be here. >> reverend al, thank you as well. >> thank you. >>> still ahead, bill gates will be here on set. and coming up next, former vice president al gore joins us here in the studio. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. i obsessed about my weight my whole life. and then, weight watchers. i amazed myself. get used to it. introducing the new weight watchers 360 program. join for free
, was a hospitable governmental environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the sec making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship. people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy. and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbed the floors, sewed the kids' clothes, cut my hair, and now we are blessed by this american dream. so i want to help keep that alive for others. and, of course, the third ingredient is the entrepreneur which is a role that i played. so those three things, entrepreneur, has hospitable government environment and the workers are what creates success in america, and we have to do everything to keep those three legs of that stool strong and vibrant. >> let me -- thank you for the opening statement. let me ask you one or two, and then we'll go around the table. um, especially interested to hear you talk about helping obama create his legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke and s
're actually o-- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. blac girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. every signature is unique, and every fingerprint unrepeatable. at sleep number, we recognize the incredible diversity
-style austerity and have bad money the way they did. we're actually -- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days.
. to do it in the environment of these big gun shows, which are basically a giant gun shop with many dealers real hi doesn't add anything to it. as police chief johnson said, it takes a minute or two to go through the background check. the second thing is that the whole point of the exercise is that it keeps the criminal from coming in and buying guns. so when mr. lapierre says, well, you know, this is no good because criminals won't subject themselves to a background check, that's precisely the point. >> sure. what was the feeling in the room from you and your colleagues after hearing gabby giffords speak today? how much of an impact do you think she had? >> i think she had a real impact. i think the other moment of real impact was when her husband, captain kelly, talked about the child at gabrielle giffords' shooting who was killed by the 13th bullet, and pointed out that if the shooter hadn't had that high capacity magazine, before he got to that 13th bullet, he would have had to reload. and that shooting came to an end when the shooter had to reload. so the moment when you have 2
and now i'm in a very good environment and there are a lot of things to be done and that i'd like to do so i have to be very engaged. it's a very, very full of things to do and i'm very happy about that. >> suarez: are you able to keep up with events in china as closely as you were when you were doing your human rights work there? >> (translated): there are many ways to get -- to become informed. in a sense, it's easier to be informed here than when i was in china. i'm not saying that in china things cannot be done. what i'm saying is that things can be done from many different angles to promote what we need to promote. >> suarez: well, since you left the country there have been continued arrests of dissidents, suppression of press freedoms with the southern weekly, attempts to control access to the internet. a lot of things are moving along in china. what does it tell you about the government's attitude toward free speech and free thought? >> (translated): i think this only goes to show that the chinese government and the party still wants to control everything and if they keep holding an
. certainly they were. but he was in a crisis environment from the moment he stepped in. his approach was to enact the biggest tax increase in the country and the biggest in connecticut history. at the same time he was doing that he was making budget cuts. there was a real flight with public employee unions in canada as a kid. -- a real fight with public employee unions in connecticut. he really had some hard choices to make over the last couple of years. connecticut stands out. host: here is a recent story from "usa today," -- let us talk about the mandates states have to balance their budgets. here is from. how significant is that? guest: the wasted governments -- it is very significant. state governments could not say that we would put these bills on. they have ways around balanced budget requirement. there are ways to make the budget look balanced on paper without being really balance. they cannot act in a countercyclical way, spend money when things did bad. they tend to cut money when things did that in the economy. then it drags itself on the economy. that is why you have the f
friend. >> it's a stressful environment. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh when a water main broke in the middle of the night, single digit temperatures gushing watt near a sheet of ice. subzero temps aren't all bad if you like ice boating. skimming across the ice at speeds of up to 60 miles an hour in what looks like a menny kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up, double bundle, i'm good. i have a lot of clothes on. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> reporter: ah, yes, key largo, been there many a time. let's look at the lowest temperatures overnight across the united states. check these out, mt. washington, new hampshire, 34 below, crane lake, minnesota, 27 below, sayre knack lake, new york, minus 23 and presque isle, maine, haven't been there yet, 23 below zero. out. we are balmy here by comparison. >> it's quite nice here and we should be counting our blessings. the folks we worry are the homeless. what are cities doing to help those who have absolutely nowher
economist say would be the policy that would make a fundamental change in the market and in the environment. essentially it puts a price on carbon pollution. carbon pollution is the main source -- carbon pollution or green house gases are the main cause of global warming. right now the emitters of carbon pollution, that's coal fired power plants, oil refineries are allowed to emit this carbon pollution and they don't pay anything for it. the idea is if carbon polluters were to have to started paying, if there were a price on this carbon pollution, it races the price of fossil fuels, it race it is price of energy and that will fund innocently drive the market toward low polluting sources of energy. that is the number one way that you could really make a difference in this area. it's also politically incredibly controversial. that means raising the price of electricity, of gasoline, of all the fundamental ways in which we drive our economy. it's very controversial. it would be very difficult. it's a third rail, an idea that is great and admired in theory but politically impossible. host: what
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-414-5999 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. sleep train'sor presidents' day presidents' day sale is on now. save up to $500 on beautyrest and posturepedic. get a sealy queen set for just $399. even get 3 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. plus, free delivery, set-up, and removal of your old set. keep more presidents in your wallet. sleep train's presidents' day sale is on now. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >>> breaking news here. this just out of phoenix. this is video from our affiliate ktvk. police responding to reports of a shooting. multiple victims at a business complex. we are told this is near 16th street and glendale avenue. this is in phoenix. the busines
clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-414-5999 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> breaking news here. this just out of phoenix. this is video from our affiliate ktvk. police responding to reports of a shooting. multiple victims at a business complex. we are told this is near 16th street and glendale avenue. this is in phoenix. the business complex. now the sus is expect, we are learning, reportedly fled from the scene. there is a search that is now under way. we are looking at aerial shots as well. we understand that there are police cars on the scene. there are ambulances and fire engines as well that responded to the report of the shooting. we also saw -- there you go. now we have the aerials there. somebody was rolled out on a stretcher earlier. this is certainly a situation that is now unfolding. it is
an environment or someone can start a business, where someone can create a new opportunity to commit people to work. that will continue to happen unless we allow -- what government control does, bidding socialism is bad for the rest. that is not true. this is a socialist country. the rich do just fine. you have to be born to aristocracy and you can have a nice school to sculpted gardens. >> you do not see it in the new rich people. we do not seize the social mobility. you do not see bill gates starting a company and building it into one of the most powerful companies in the world. that is that we overcome these transitions. what is most dangerous is the power and control of government calcifies. it makes it harder for them to start. this is the threatening the future of all of us. >> i am an attorney and a newspaper columnist from wyoming. many people here today attended the march for like yesterday. we are aware that 55 million people are not here today. they're not paying into social security. could you please speak to the policy indications of that as recognized by the republican party?
that let you do what you do and, live in this environment. bill: there he is. speaking like an american, huh? like that. mickelson's net worth is $180 million. the guy ain't hurting but tiger woods says mickelson was right about taxes especially in california and says high taxes was why woods moved out of the california and moved to florida with no state income tax in the first place. both of these guys are from california. mickelson made his hometown there for, he was born and raised in san diego. for him to leave the state is a big, big deal. if you're taking home 37 cents on the dollar, 47 cents on the dollar, i think it is okay to speak up. martha: it is something for all americans to give some thought to. bill: why did he apologize? martha: i don't know why he apologized, the backlash against it, saying is it right for any american to spend 63 cents of their dollar, of every dollar they make and hand it over to the government? bill: state, county, federal. martha: so much discussion about fair share and people, people obviously, some people are outraged. he can afford it. that is n
, about of the word "environment," you know, were republicans. and teddy roosevelt being the classic one with gifford pincheaux, his interior secretary. and he established the first national park, i believe. right? >> yes, sir. >> bill: and on from there. so if it's so important, why didn't president obama do anything about it in the first four years? >> he had a tough time. he tried to go the legislative route. we got some good legislative comprehensive climate and energy legislation through the house but it didn't get through the senate. so, what the president did do was, he went after the 30% of car body shop pollution. of course, the sorts of our xlooiment problems right now. he we want after the 30% of that in our motor vehicles. so we are going to double, under an agreement that the white house reached with car makers we will double our gas mileage to cut that carbon footprint in half. what he has a great opportunity to do right now, historic opportunity, is to go after the 40% of the carbon pollution that comes from our power plants around the
that can't be do. >> there are all kinds of estrogen leaking things in the environment now. >> stephanie: right. >> like plastic bottles. >> stephanie: yeah. i don't know the androe gel seems very, very scary to me. and i love that it says don't let it get on anybody else. >> yeah your wife may grow a penis if she comes in contact with androe gel. >> stephanie: i'm afraid i'm going to grow my unibrow back. here some the sexist headlines and -- >> yep. and then sean hannity goes on the air with big graphics saying hilary unglued. first he says she didn't care. she was all fake. then she says hilary unglued. >> stephanie: yeah, it was too staged and she was unglued. >> yes, an emotionally unhinged train wreck. >> stephanie: yeah, they obviously -- you listen john to the fringes of right-wing world they were accusing her of faking a concussion and a blood clot. >> yeah. >> stephanie: and now her show of emotion was a ploy. ron johnson said i'm not sure she rehearsed for that type of question, i think she just decided she was going to describe emotionally about the death o
somehow people who pay taxes are not demonized? that is novel in this political environment. bill: education will fight that. they will say, give it towards schools. >> right. bill: i would say when i heard the story, sarah palin had a lay on the books in alaska that returned oil receipts to taxpayers in that state? >> that is natural resource under the ground. saying all alaskans should enjoy that. this is a little different. what texas is saying we've got an amazing economic boom. this is what rick perry is saying. this is your money. this is a novel part of it. when we hear most politicians talk about taxes, it is almost as if we work and their money. whatever we get in our check is, hey,. bill: take, take. if he gets this and is successful they will crown the guy thing. there is another big topic i want to roll in here. we ask viewers questions all the time. gdp number was paltry that came out earlier. because you asked, bya, we get this question right now. explain the rise in the stock market versus lowering expectations and consumer sentiment and debt. you've got a dow bumpi
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